REVIEW: Lush Rusalka Delights (Minnesota Opera)

January 25, 2016 - Supermoon

Minnesota Opera’s prolongation of Antonín Dvořák’s Rusalka, with soprano Kelly Kaduce in a pretension role, has returned to a Ordway after a premiere in 2008. This angel story show had not seemed in United States until a mid-1970s, though this richly textured entertainment and Dvořák’s full-bodied measure should be an evident favorite for Minnesota show fans.

Kelly Kaduce sings a famous Song to a Moon to a Supermoon backdrop. Photo by Dan Norman.
Kelly Kaduce sings a famous “Song to a Moon” to a Supermoon backdrop. Photo by Dan Norman.

Kaduce seems tailor-made for a purpose of a comfortless H2O nymph, compellingly embodying Rusalka’s wish and disadvantage in Act I, undone overpower and recklessness in Act II, and cool despondency in Act III – all with a rich, colourful voice and fluent form to constraint a full operation of her character’s journey. (Dvořzák’s first-act aria “Song to a Moon” is one of a many pleasing pieces created for a soprano voice, and Kaduce’s interpretation does not disappoint.)

Another prominence of a night is drum Ben Wager in a purpose of Vodník, a H2O gnome, who transitions credibly from strong inlet suggestion to sad father; his voice brings out both a abyss and adore of Dvořzák’s music. As a magician Ježibaba, Marianne Cornetti vacillates between charmingly batty and indeed terrifying to good effect, with a commanding mezzo-soprano.

Standing in for Khachatur Badalyan in a purpose of a Prince on opening night was A.J. Glueckert; Glueckert is some-more courteous than hastily as a regretful lead, believably changeable about his dear Rusalka in Act II and enticed by a arrogant and conniving Foreign Princess (sung beautifully by an icy Shannon Prickett). Siena Forest, Bergen Baker, and Jennifer Panara give voice to a dryads of a timberland surrounding Rusalka’s river, with David Walton appearing as a Hunter.

The genuine strengths of a prolongation are a overwhelming visuals on display, that usually offer to raise and elaborate on a movement and a music. The prolongation is a investigate in contrasts: Erhard Rom’s meagre and superb set pattern provides a ideal template for Wendall K. Harrington’s unreal projections and Robert Wierzel and Paul Hackenmueller’s clear lighting, that all work together to ride a assembly from a lushness and vibrancy of a healthy universe to a sheer and hard mortal realm.

A contingent of dryads dance. Photo by Dan Norman.
A contingent of dryads dance. Photo by Dan Norman.

Kärin Kopischke’s costumes and David Zimmerman’s hair and makeup pattern prominence a stern ritual of Prince and Princess in antithesis to a worldly comfort and issuing palliate of a timberland and stream folk. Though there was an occasional impulse in a second act when a activity surrounding a categorical characters pulled concentration divided from where it should have been, altogether Heidi Spesard-Noble’s choreography blended dancers and singers seamlessly together. Eric Simonson’s theatre instruction and Michael Christie’s conducting directed Saturday dusk to success.

Additional photos:

One of a particular sets designed by Erhard Rom (Kelly Kaduce, center, as Rusalka).
One of a particular sets designed by Erhard Rom (Kelly Kaduce, center, as Rusalka).
Dancing during a Prince's castle. Photo by Dan Norman.
Dancing during a Prince’s castle. Photo by Dan Norman.
The trail of adore is frequency well-spoken with Rusalka (Kelly Kaduce) and a Prince (Khachatur Badalyan). Photo by Dan Norman.
The trail of adore is frequency well-spoken with Rusalka (Kelly Kaduce) and a Prince (Khachatur Badalyan). Photo by Dan Norman.

source ⦿ http://twincitiesarts.com/2016/01/24/review-lush-rusalka-delights-minnesota-opera/

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