New clues about how Earth got the moon

January 29, 2016 - Supermoon


The moon enters a limit obscure on Sep 28 in Cognocoli Monticchi in a French Mediterranean island of Corsica. Tonight's supermoon-so called given of it is a closest full moon to a Earth this year - is partularly singular as it coincides with a lunar eclipse, a multiple that has not happened given 1982 and won't occur again until 2013. AFP PHOTO/ PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA        (Photo credit should review PASCAL POCHARD CASABIANCA/AFP/Getty Images)

The moon enters a limit obscure on Sep 28 in Cognocoli Monticchi in a French Mediterranean island of Corsica. Tonight’s supermoon-so called given of it is a closest full moon to a Earth this year – is partularly singular as it coincides with a lunar eclipse, a multiple that has not happened given 1982 and won’t occur again until 2013. AFP PHOTO/ PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA (Photo credit should review PASCAL POCHARD CASABIANCA/AFP/Getty Images)

The moon enters a limit obscure on Sep 28 in Cognocoli Monticchi in a French Mediterranean island of Corsica. Tonight's supermoon-so called given of it is a closest full moon to a Earth this year - is partularly singular as it coincides with a lunar eclipse, a multiple that has not happened given 1982 and won't occur again until 2013. AFP PHOTO/ PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA        (Photo credit should review PASCAL POCHARD CASABIANCA/AFP/Getty Images)

The moon enters a limit obscure on Sep 28 in Cognocoli Monticchi in a French Mediterranean island of Corsica. Tonight’s supermoon-so called given of it is a closest full moon to a Earth this year – is partularly singular as it coincides with a lunar eclipse, a multiple that has not happened given 1982 and won’t occur again until 2013. AFP PHOTO/ PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA (Photo credit should review PASCAL POCHARD CASABIANCA/AFP/Getty Images)

(CNN) — It’s a usually universe besides Earth that male has set feet on. But we still don’t know accurately how it got there.

Now, rocks brought behind by a Apollo astronauts in a late ’60s and early ’70s are providing new clues about how Earth got a moon.

Many scientists have prolonged theorized that a moon shaped after a world called Theia crashed into Earth about 4.5 billion years ago.

A UCLA-led investigate group compared Earth rocks and moon rocks and dynamic a pile-up was a head-on collision, not a glancing blow as progressing theories stated.

“The moon was shaped by a violent, head-on collision between a early Earth and a ‘planetary embryo’ called Theia approximately 100 million years after a Earth formed,” a group pronounced in on UCLA’s website.

The group reported a new investigate in a biography Science.

The researchers analyzed 7 moon rocks brought behind to a Earth by a Apollo 12, 15 and 17 astronauts. They compared them with 6 volcanic rocks from Earth, 5 from Hawaii and one from Arizona.

They found a oxygen in all a rocks had a identical chemical signature.

“We don’t see any disproportion between a Earth’s and a moon’s oxygen isotopes; they’re indistinguishable,” pronounced Edward Young, a study’s lead author.

Young pronounced that if Earth had usually perceived a glancing blow, many of a moon would have been done adult of Theia, and a Earth and moon rocks would not be so similar.

So what happened to Theia? Scientists contend it didn’t tarry a collision, solely for some pieces that got churned in with a Earth and moon. If it hadn’t crashed with Earth, it competence have turn a bone-fide planet, Young said.

But afterwards Earth wouldn’t have a moon. That would meant no pleasing moonlit nights, fewer songs and most opposite continue for us Earthlings. The moon gets credit for moderating Earth’s stagger and stabilizing a climate.

source ⦿ http://q13fox.com/2016/01/29/new-clues-about-how-earth-got-its-moon/

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